Photo Natacha Raffin

Natacha Raffin

Professeur(e)
  • Email
  • Axe de recherche

      Développement Durable, Environnement et Energie

  • Thème(s)
    • Macroéconomie de long-terme
    • Croissance
    • Environnement

2018-34 "Corporate Social Responsibility and workers' motivation at the industry equilibrium"

Victor Hiller, Natacha Raffin

Voir Télécharger le document de travail (via EconPapers)

Résumé
Dans cet article, nous considérons une industrie dans laquelle les firmes se font concurrence à deux niveaux, sur le marché du travail et le marché des biens. Sur le marché du travail, des travailleurs « socialement responsables » co-existent avec des travailleurs « égoïstes ». Les entreprises peuvent utiliser stratégiquement la CSR pour attirer et stimuler les travailleurs responsables. A travers cette pratique, les firmes vertueuses réduisent leur coût de production et développent donc un avantage compétitif sur le marché des biens. En conséquence, les stratégies en terme de CSR poursuivies par les firmes affectent le degré de compétition sur ce même marché. En retour, les incitations qu'ont les firmes à adopter un comportement vertueux (investir en CSR) sont réduites lorsque la compétition sur le marché des biens est sévère. Il existe ainsi une relation à double sens entre concurrence et investissement en CSR. Ainsi, une augmentation du nombre de travailleurs responsables, en modifiant l’intensité de la concurrence, est susceptible de réduire le niveau agrégé de CSR. Nous montrons également qu’une augmentation de la concurrence sur le marché des biens peut affecter positivement et négativement la performance sociale d’une industrie selon que la proportion de travailleurs responsables dans cette industrie est faible ou élevée.
Classification-JEL
D64; D86; L13; M14; Q50.
Mot(s) clé(s)
Responsabilité Sociale des Entreprises, Motivation pro-sociale, Screening, Concurrence, Equilibre Industriel
Fichier

2016-36 "The falling sperm counts story": A limit to growth?"

Johanna Etner, Natacha Raffin, Thomas Seegmuller

Voir Télécharger le document de travail (via EconPapers)

Résumé
We develop an overlapping generations model of growth, in which agents differ through their ability to procreate. Based on epidemiological evidence, we assume that pollution is a cause of this health heterogeneity, affecting sperm quality. Nevertheless, agents with impaired fertility may incur health treatments in order to increase their chances of parenthood. In this set-up, we analyse the dynamic behaviour of the economy and characterise the situation reached in the long run. Then, we determine the optimal solution that prevails when a social planner maximises a Millian utilitarian criterion and propose a set of available economic instruments to decentralise the optimal solution. We underscore that to correct for both the externalities of pollution and the induced-health inefficiency, it is necessary to tax physical capital while it requires to overall subsidy mostly harmed agents within the economy. Hence, we argue that fighting against the sources of an altered reproductive health is more relevant than directly inciting agents to incur health treatments.
Classification-JEL
O44; Q56; I18.
Mot(s) clé(s)
Pollution; Growth; Fertility; Health.
Fichier

2014-47 "The cost of pollution on longevity, welfare and economic stability"

Natacha Raffin, Thomas Seegmuller

Voir Télécharger le document de travail (via EconPapers)

Résumé
This paper presents an overlapping generations model where pollution, private and public healths are all determinants of longevity. Public expenditure, financed through labour taxation, provide both public health and abatement. We study the complementarity between the three components of longevity on welfare and economic stability. At the steady state, we show that an appropriate fiscal policy may enhance welfare. However, when pollution is heavily harmful for longevity, the economy might experience aggregate instability or endogenous cycles. Nonetheless, a fiscal policy, which raises the share of public spending devoted to health, may display stabilizing virtues and rule out cycles. This allows us to recommend the design of the public policy that may comply with the dynamic and welfare objectives.
Classification-JEL
J10; O40; Q56; C62.
Mot(s) clé(s)
Longevity; Pollution; Welfare; Complex dynamics.
Fichier

2012-47 "Longevity, pollution and growth"

Natacha Raffin, Thomas Seegmuller

Voir Télécharger le document de travail (via EconPapers)

Résumé
We analyze the interplay between longevity, pollution and growth. We develop an
OLG model where longevity, pollution and growth are endogenous. The authorities may provide two types of public services, public health and environmental maintenance, that participate to increase agents’ life expectancy and to sustain growth in the long term. We show that global dynamics might be featured by a high growth rate equilibrium, associated with longer life expectancy and a environmental poverty trap. We examine changes in public policies: increasing public intervention on health or environmental maintenance display opposite effects on global dynamics, i.e. on the size of the trap and on the level of the stable balanced growth path. On the contrary, each type of public policy induces a negative leverage on the long run rate of growth.
Classification-JEL
I15; O44; Q56
Mot(s) clé(s)
Life expectancy; Pollution; Health; Growth
Fichier
load Veuillez patienter ...