Unité mixte de recherche 7235

Élisabeth Tovar

Tél. professionnel : 7825

Bureau à Paris Nanterre : G508B

Axe de recherche : Développement Durable, Environnement et Énergie

Thèmes : Economie normative
economie du bien-être
economie urbaine
economie du travail

I am an Associate Professor (Maître de Conférences) at Paris Nanterre University and EconomiX.

 

I work on empirical social choice issues. I’m interested on methodological and measurement issues when implementing distributive justice theories.

 

During my PhD, I discussed the perspective of Justice theories (utilitarianism, rawlsianism, libertarianism, liberal egalitarianism) on urban residential segregation (Tovar, 2011). I have worked on the normative framework of urban well-being measurement, developing a capabilist-based multidimensional definition where location matters when measuring opportunities and agency freedom. An initial implementation was focused on poverty and segregation and an improved revision scrutinized local inequalities in the Paris region. The bottom line: going past income issues and using a broader, normatively-justified definition of well-being sharpens the perception of the social divide of the Paris region!

 

Focusing on another aspect of urban inequalities, I have also worked on the development of a new measure for local job accessibility, with a work-in-progress public-policy-oriented extension [with Matthieu Bunel].

Working from a spatial point of view challenges standard Justice theories. I am currently working on this issue; using empirical social choice to do so seems fun and promising.

 

I’ve been lucky to benefit from an ANR ‘Jeune chercheur’ grant to fund survey to follow this line of research.

In particular, I am interested in finding evidence on the support of Sen’s well-being conceptualization, on three aspects.

 

In my PhD thesis and early work, I justified my focus on Sen’s capability approach (instead of a more traditional utilitarian view) because of the relevance, in my mind, of the adaptive preferences argument in a segregation framework. Indeed, if we agree that one’s residential location hinders on one’s perception of Society and on one’s possible achievements and impossibilities, then using a subjective well-being measurement (such as utility) is questionable, since those that live in deprived neighborhoods adapt their preferences and conception of their opportunities to the outcomes they believe are reachable: their subjective utility measure is ‘subdued’ compared the one of those that, because they live in privileged areas, aim for more and are therefore naturally satisfied by less. I want to challenge [with Frédéric Dufaux] this adaptive preferences postulate by showing if socially different persons (in terms of residential location, social position, trajectories, identities…) do have different visions 1) of their own well-being and 2) of Social justice principles in general.

 

The second and third important aspects of the capability approach are its consequentialist nature (compared to other, more procedural, social justice theories such as Rawlsianism and libertarianism) and its multidimensional definition of well-being, where effective realizations must be completed by freedom as opportunities and as agency freedom. I plan to check [with Sophie Harnay and Régis Lanneau] if consequentialism is universally preferred by people in all circumstances and if freedoms are valued as important dimensions of well-being.

AGENDA

lundi 28 novembre 2022

Law, Institutions and Economics in Nanterre (LIEN)

Marianne Lumeau (CREM, Université de Rennes I)

En salle 614 et en distanciel

American bias in a local music streaming market: curation push vs. preference pull

mardi 29 novembre 2022

Recherche et Economie et Socioéconomie Politique, des Institutions et des Régulations (RESPIR)

Adriano do Vale (Université de Poitiers) et Léo Malherbe (Université Université de Picardie Jules Verne)

Shedding light on a Blind Spot: New empirical evidence on the Accountability of the EuroSystem National Central Banks

mardi 29 novembre 2022

Series of Webinars on Economics of Environment, Energy and Transport (SWEEET)

Thomas Douenne (Univ. Amsterdam), Albert Jan Hummel (Univ. Amsterdam), Marcelo Pedroni (Univ. Amsterdam)

Optimal Fiscal Policy in a Climate-Economy Model with Heterogeneous Households

jeudi 1 décembre 2022

Doctorants

Nicolas de Roux

Capturing international influences in US monetary policy through a NLP approach

lundi 5 décembre 2022

Law, Institutions and Economics in Nanterre (LIEN)

Vincent Lefrère (Institut Mines Telecom)

En salle 614 et en distanciel

Privacy, Data and Competition: The Case of Apps For Young Children

mardi 6 décembre 2022

Recherche et Economie et Socioéconomie Politique, des Institutions et des Régulations (RESPIR)

Eric Monnet (EHESS et PSE)

Le rôle d’amortisseur des banques centrales – une perspective historique

jeudi 8 décembre 2022

Lunch

Guillaume Pierné

12h - 13h, salle 110

TBA

lundi 12 décembre 2022

Law, Institutions and Economics in Nanterre (LIEN)

Clément Brébion (Copenhagen BS)

En salle 614 et en distanciel

Unemployment Insurance Eligibility and Employment Duration

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