Economics and the Law in Europe in the 20th century – History and Methodology International workshop

Thursday 25 September 2014 - Friday 26 September 2014




Economics and the Law in Europe in the 20th century – History and Methodology
International workshop

September 25-26, 2014
University Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense & University Paris Dauphine
200, Avenue de la République – 92001 Nanterre cedex – FRANCE

Various authors have been studying the recent history of the interdisciplinary relationship between law and economics in the 20th century for several years, in the field of economics, law and social sciences. Works nevertheless focus on the United States and dismiss the European part of this history. Thus, the gradual development of works at the intersection of economics and law and questioning the implicit or explicit relationship between the two disciplines remains quite unexplored. From a European standpoint, the history of the economic analysis of law, law and economics, economic law, and the economics of institutions has not been a matter of concern so far.

The purpose of the workshop is therefore to study the interdisciplinary relationships between law and economics in Europe during the 20th century. It raises several major questions. Among others, when do questions at the crossroads of law and economics emerge in Europe initially? What are the reciprocal influences exerted by both disciplines on each other? What are the main evolutions in the mutual influence of both disciplines over the 20th century? Is there any European specificity in the relation between law and economics? Who are the economists and the legal scholars getting interested in law and economics? Which legal and economic fields are most impacted by the other discipline respectively? Can any specifically European strands of thought be identified? Does the European conception of interdisciplinarity take some specificity of civil law countries into account, or is European law and economics simply a transposition of the currents of thought in common law countries? Can we observe any European influence on the economic and legal analyses developed in the United States? Can we identify any “domestic” approaches to the relationship between law and economics across European countries?

To answer these questions, the workshop will summon up various tools and approaches borrowing from the history of the economic thought, legal works and sociological analyses. The purpose is to overcome the existing disciplinary barriers so as to build a new interdisciplinary approach. The workshop will gather economists, legal scholars, historians, all French and international specialists in their field. Contributions will adopt either a historical or a methodological approach. They will take the form of monographs devoted to authors, legal and economic fields (competition policy, liability law, contract economics and law, economic analysis of law…), and the study of the interdisciplinary relationship between law and economics in a given European country or at a given period of the 20th century. They will focus on the theoretical aspects of the debates as well as on their practical and political consequences.


Program

Organizing committee

  • Sophie Harnay, maître de conférences, HDR, Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense, EconomiX – CNRS UMR 7235; 200, avenue de la République, 92001 Nanterre Cedex, France
  • Thierry Kirat, Directeur de recherches, Université Paris Dauphine, IRISSO CNRS UMR 7170, Place du maréchal de Lattre de Tassigny, 75775 Paris cedex 16.

Scientific committee

  • Jérôme Boyer des Roches, Professeur de sciences économiques, Université Paris Dauphine
  • Bertrand Du Marais, Conseiller d’Etat, détaché comme Professeur de droit, Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense
  • Pierre Dockès, Professeur de sciences économiques, Université Lumière Lyon 2, Triangle UMR 5206
  • Arnaud Raynouard, Professeur de droit, Université Dauphine
  • Alain Marciano, Maître de conférences en sciences économiques, HDR, Université de Montpellier, Lameta
  • Nicholas Mercuro, Professor of Law, Michigan State University
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