Photo Dominique Meurs

Dominique Meurs

Professeur(e)
  • Email
  • Tél. professionnel 0140975912
  • Bureau à Paris Nanterre (Bât. + num.) GR02D
  • Research group

      Développement Durable, Environnement et Energie

  • Theme(s)
    • Microéconométrie du marché du travail
    • Inégalités
    • Discrimination
    • Genre

2019-13 "Having a child? Here is the bill - Parenthood, Earnings and Careers in an Internal Labor"

Claudio Lucifora, Dominique Meurs, Elena Vilar

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Abstract
Using a unique 12-years panel of personnel records from a large French company, we nd
that becoming mother (extensive fertility margins) largely a ects labor market outcomes.
Instead, fatherhood does not signi cantly impact on men's wages or careers. An event study
approach with the use of non-parents as control group enables us to show that, prior to
childbirth, future mothers' earnings are in line with that of non-mothers. However, one year
after birth, they start to fall, reaching -9% in total pay and -30% in individual bonuses.
This drop is persistent: 8 years after childbirth there is no evidence of a catching-up trend.
Mothers also have lower chances to climb-up the hierarchy of the rm and be promoted to
managerial positions. A decomposition of the motherhood penalty shows that these \missed
promotions", likely due to an increase in absenteeism during the child's pre-school age, are
the main determinants of mothers' lower outcomes within the rm.
Classification-JEL
J13 J16 J31
Mot(s) clé(s)
Children  Motherhood penalty  Gender inequalities  Event study
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2017-29 "Differences in positions along a hierarchy: Counterfactuals based on an assignment model"

Laurent Gobillon, Dominique Meurs, Sébastien Roux

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Abstract
We propose an assignment model in which positions along a hierarchy are attributed to individuals depending on their characteristics. Our theoretical framework can be used to study differences in assignment and outcomes across groups and we show how it can motivate decomposition and counterfactual exercises. It constitutes an alternative to more descriptive methods such as Oaxaca decompositions and quantile counterfactual approaches. In an application, we study gender disparities in the public and private sectors with a French exhaustive administrative dataset. Whereas females are believed to be treated more fairly in the public sector, we find that the gender gap in propensity to get job positions along the wage distribution is rather similar in the two sectors. The gender wage gap in the public sector is 13:3 points and it increases by only 0:7 percentage points when workers are assigned to job positions according to the rules of the private sector. Nevertheless, the gender gap at the last decile in the public sector increases by as much as 3:6 percentage points when using the assignment rules of the private sector.
Classification-JEL
C51, J31, J45
Mot(s) clé(s)
assignment, distributions, counterfactuals, wages, gender, public sector
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2016-8 "Gender inequalities in pensions: Are determinants the same in the private and public sectors?"

Carole Bonnet, Dominique Meurs, Benoît Rapoport

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Abstract
While the average gender gap in pensions is quite well documented, gender differences in the distribution of pensions have rarely been explored. We show in this paper that pension dispersion is very similar for men and women within the French pension system of a given sector (public or private). However, the determinants of these gender inequalities are not the same. Using a regression-based decomposition of the Gini coefficient, we find that pension dispersion is mainly due to dispersion of the reference wage. Gender differences are less marked among civil servants. For women, pension dispersion is also due to dispersion in contribution periods. We also decompose the Gini coefficient by source of income to measure the impact of institutional rules on the extent of pension inequality. Unexpectedly, we find that the impact of pension minima is limited, although slightly larger for civil servants than for private sector employees.
Classification-JEL
J14, J16, H55.
Mot(s) clé(s)
Pension, Private and Public sector, Gender gap, Gini coefficient, Decomposition.
File

2011-3 "Child-related career interruptions and the gender wage gap in France"

Dominique Meurs, Ariane Pailhé, Sophie Ponthieux

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Abstract
In this paper, we investigate the extent of the effects of children and child-related time out of the labor market on the gender wage gap in France, with special attention to its impact on the accumulation and composition of human capital. Measuring this impact requires detailed information on the individuals‟ activity history that is rarely available. The French survey "Families and Employers" (Ined, 2005) provides this information. We first look at men's and women's wage determinants, including the penalties associated with unemployment and time out of the labor market. We find that having controlled for the jobs' characteristics and selection into employment, there is a penalty attached to child-related time out of the labor market, which affects only women. We do not find any direct negative impact of children on women's current hourly wage at the mean. Then for a sub-sample of men and women aged from 39 to 49, we use a decomposition of the gender wage gap into an "interruption" wage gap between women and a gender wage gap between women who have never taken child-related time out and men; we find that the wage gap between men and women who have never interrupted their participation in the labor force is essentially "unexplained", while the wage gap between women who have had child-related interruptions and women who have not is essentially "explained".
Classification-JEL
J13 J16 J24 J31
Mot(s) clé(s)
Wages; Human capital; Children; Family pay gap; Statistical discrimination; Wage gap decomposition
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